Meantime Blog


News, views, insights, and musings from the Meantime teamon the world of PR, logistics, and Royal Greenwich

The digitalisation race is for targeted improvements to efficiency


Smaller freight forwarders need to digitalise now, or risk dropping out of the race entirely

 

The race to digitalise has already begun, and companies with access to greater funds have a head-start.

High costs are the most significant hurdle for smaller freight forwarders, and this means that smaller companies are already playing catch-up in the digitalisation race.

Even after embracing digitalisation, rather than gaining an edge, digitalisation will just allow them to keep up, but nonetheless, the benefits of digitalisation far outweigh the disadvantages.

Before continuing, it is important to clarify the difference between digitalisation and digitisation.

Digitisation describes the process of converting any form of data (usually text/image/numerical) into a digital format (in its simplest forms 1s and 0s) that can be read by computers.

Digitalisation is the improvement of business processes by leveraging the data generated by digitisation.

With digitalisation, data generation, data-crunching, verification and control can all be completely automated, making significant improvements to efficiency, accuracy, and quality of data.

The most obvious advantage digitalisation brings to freight forwarders is that it allows instant collaboration between colleagues, partners and customers, as data can be shared, and stored in the Cloud.

Anyone, or rather, those with permission, can access this data and use it for creating reports, analyses, and transparency, all of which contribute greatly to improvements in customer service in addition to efficiency.

As larger companies are already reaping the effiiciency and customer service benefits of digitalisation, it is now not a question of whether to digitalise, or why to digitalise, it is a question of when to digitalise.

Otherwise smaller freight forwarders smaller freight forwarders might have to drop out of the race entirely.


About the author

John Cowley

John was born the year Halley’s Comet last flew by. He studied Classics at the University of St. Andrews, and has lived in numerous countries where he picked up the languages. He speaks fluent German, Mandarin Chinese, Italian, and a little Korean. John has a Master’s in International Journalism and has been published in the local and national press.