Multimodal

Multimodal 2019 celebrates twelve years of putting shippers, retailers, wholesalers, importers and exporters in front of exhibitors who offer the latest logistics and supply chain solutions.

Visit website www.multimodal.org.uk

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‘Smaller’ companies must prepare now for new Irish Customs border


Coca-Cola estimates Brexit will cost the company as much as EUR 30 million, with its manufacturing plant in the Republic of Ireland, bottling facility in Northern Ireland, and suppliers of packaging and other goods located throughout Europe, all taking a hit.

Birmingham, UK, Thursday, 3rd May 2018 – Coca-Cola estimates Brexit will cost the company as much as EUR 30 million, with its manufacturing plant in the Republic of Ireland, bottling facility in Northern Ireland, and suppliers of packaging and other goods located throughout Europe, all taking a hit.

That is according to Tom Thornton, President of the Irish International Freight Association (IIFA), who added: “A company that size can cope and will pass on some costs to the consumers, but a lot of smaller companies won’t be able to do that.”

Thornton was speaking yesterday to delegates at one of several Brexit sessions at Multimodal 2018, the UK’s largest logistics exhibition and conference, taking place at the Birmingham NEC this week.

Of course, neither Coca-Cola nor anyone else knows exactly what the post-Brexit arrangements will be, as Robert Keen, Director General of British International Freight Association (BIFA) pointed out.

“We haven’t got a lot more to tell you than we could during this session last year, but all the indications are that whatever is decided, it will increase bureaucracy and red tape,” he said.

The politicians always say it can be sorted by technology, but like others at the session, Peter MacSwiney, Chairman of Agency Sector Management (ASM) and Co-Chair of the Joint Customs Consultative Committee (JCCC) Brexit Sub Group, was sceptical.

“We are unpicking everything that has been established over the last 40 years,” he said. “There are very complex supply chains that cross the borders many times so there is a huge gulf between the political aspirations and the issues on the ground.”

Even the expansion of trusted trader schemes such as Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) do not mean that shippers will not need to make Customs declarations, explained Robert Windsor, Policy and Compliance Manager and Executive Director for BIFA. “Technology might make it better, but it does not solve the issue.”

Thornton said there were 68,000 companies in Ireland trading with the UK who have never dealt with a Customs border.

“We are trying to encourage them to look at the tariffs and categories for their products, so they can produce paperwork which forwarders can use to prepare Customs entries. They need to understand the language and what is likely to be expected of them.”

The issue is further complicated as the UK is in the process (planned long before Brexit) of replacing CHIEF, its existing Customs entry system, and all data sets and “the complexities are huge”, said MacSwiney.

“There is just no way we can put in place by March next year any practical measures to do anything different to what we do now.”

The speakers all agreed that some sort of special arrangement between Ireland and Northern Ireland was not realistic as whatever was agreed for the Irish border would need to be approved by all EU States.

Windsor explained: “EU legislation is very precise and detailed, so I do not think there will be a fudge. It would have much wider implications, with other members then seeking similar arrangements where it suited their interests.”

Ends

About Multimodal 2018

Multimodal is the UK and Ireland’s leading freight transport and logistics exhibition, which also features a series of topical seminars and master classes, and hosts a Shippers’ Village, giving freight buyers a private space to meet logistics suppliers.

Multimodal 2017 was the biggest in the show’s history, with over 345 exhibitors and a record-breaking attendance of 9,449 supply chain executives.

The supply chain show, in its 11th year, is free-to-attend and Multimodal 2018 took place this week at the Birmingham NEC, with a record number of visitors expected once again.

The FTA Multimodal Awards Night took place on the first evening of Multimodal 2018, at the VOX at Resorts World at the NEC, and was attended by over 800 guests.

The Awards recognise excellence in air, road, rail, maritime, and freight forwarding services and are voted for by the thousands of readers of the Multimodal newsletter, as well as FTA members, and exhibitors at Multimodal.

Multimodal 2019 takes place from 18th to 20th June next year.

For more information visit multimodal.org.uk

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Coca-Cola estimates Brexit will cost the company as much as EUR 30 million, with its manufacturing plant in the Republic of Ireland, bottling facility in Northern Ireland, and suppliers of packaging and other goods located throughout Europe, all taking a hit.

Birmingham, UK, Thursday, 3rd May 2018 – Coca-Cola estimates Brexit will cost the company as much as EUR 30 million, with its manufacturing plant in the Republic of Ireland, bottling facility in Northern Ireland, and suppliers of packaging and other goods located throughout Europe, all taking a hit.

That is according to Tom Thornton, President of the Irish International Freight Association (IIFA), who added: “A company that size can cope and will pass on some costs to the consumers, but a lot of smaller companies won’t be able to do that.”

Thornton was speaking yesterday to delegates at one of several Brexit sessions at Multimodal 2018, the UK’s largest logistics exhibition and conference, taking place at the Birmingham NEC this week.

Of course, neither Coca-Cola nor anyone else knows exactly what the post-Brexit arrangements will be, as Robert Keen, Director General of British International Freight Association (BIFA) pointed out.

“We haven’t got a lot more to tell you than we could during this session last year, but all the indications are that whatever is decided, it will increase bureaucracy and red tape,” he said.

The politicians always say it can be sorted by technology, but like others at the session, Peter MacSwiney, Chairman of Agency Sector Management (ASM) and Co-Chair of the Joint Customs Consultative Committee (JCCC) Brexit Sub Group, was sceptical.

“We are unpicking everything that has been established over the last 40 years,” he said. “There are very complex supply chains that cross the borders many times so there is a huge gulf between the political aspirations and the issues on the ground.”

Even the expansion of trusted trader schemes such as Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) do not mean that shippers will not need to make Customs declarations, explained Robert Windsor, Policy and Compliance Manager and Executive Director for BIFA. “Technology might make it better, but it does not solve the issue.”

Thornton said there were 68,000 companies in Ireland trading with the UK who have never dealt with a Customs border.

“We are trying to encourage them to look at the tariffs and categories for their products, so they can produce paperwork which forwarders can use to prepare Customs entries. They need to understand the language and what is likely to be expected of them.”

The issue is further complicated as the UK is in the process (planned long before Brexit) of replacing CHIEF, its existing Customs entry system, and all data sets and “the complexities are huge”, said MacSwiney.

“There is just no way we can put in place by March next year any practical measures to do anything different to what we do now.”

The speakers all agreed that some sort of special arrangement between Ireland and Northern Ireland was not realistic as whatever was agreed for the Irish border would need to be approved by all EU States.

Windsor explained: “EU legislation is very precise and detailed, so I do not think there will be a fudge. It would have much wider implications, with other members then seeking similar arrangements where it suited their interests.”

Ends

About Multimodal 2018

Multimodal is the UK and Ireland’s leading freight transport and logistics exhibition, which also features a series of topical seminars and master classes, and hosts a Shippers’ Village, giving freight buyers a private space to meet logistics suppliers.

Multimodal 2017 was the biggest in the show’s history, with over 345 exhibitors and a record-breaking attendance of 9,449 supply chain executives.

The supply chain show, in its 11th year, is free-to-attend and Multimodal 2018 took place this week at the Birmingham NEC, with a record number of visitors expected once again.

The FTA Multimodal Awards Night took place on the first evening of Multimodal 2018, at the VOX at Resorts World at the NEC, and was attended by over 800 guests.

The Awards recognise excellence in air, road, rail, maritime, and freight forwarding services and are voted for by the thousands of readers of the Multimodal newsletter, as well as FTA members, and exhibitors at Multimodal.

Multimodal 2019 takes place from 18th to 20th June next year.

For more information visit multimodal.org.uk

Multimodal is firmly established as the UK, Ireland and Northern Europe’s premier freight transport, logistics and supply chain management event.

Whether you are an equipment supplier, port, haulier, shipping line, 3PL or forwarder, Multimodal offers a unique opportunity to make valuable face to face contact with new prospects and existing companies.   ​Year on year, shippers and cargo owners attend to improve their businesses; by finding ways of moving their products more efficiently and by meeting new suppliers.

Multimodal represents every logistics sector under one roof, and is characterised by key vertical sectors, including manufacturing, retail, agribusiness, chemical, automotive, electronics, FMCG, food & drink, fashion, pharmaceuticals, construction, aerospace, energy, real estate, recycling, paper/print and perishables, amongst others, whilst horizontally, the show covers all modes of transportation, including sea, road, rail, airand inland waterways.

This matrix design makes Multimodal incredibly valuable and accessible for shippers – whilst also affording them the opportunity to successfully meet and network with peers from other sectors, which is another key reason for their attendance.

With AI and blockchain the newest kids on the block in what seems to be a never-ending process of technological innovation – it is clear that our industry is on the cusp of major technological transformation. Multimodal 2019 will be embracing this shift by updating our branding and website and incorporating elements of digitisation, blockchain, AR, AI and robotics in to the Show.